Jenny Mendez Isenburg | Boston Real Estate, Brookline Real Estate, Natick Real Estate


If you recently bought or sold a house, you likely will need to pack up your electronics and transport them to a new location in the near future. As such, it is important to pack your electronics correctly to reduce the risk of damage.

Now, let's take a look at three best practices for packing electronics.

1. Follow the Manufacturer's Instructions

In many instances, electronics manufacturers will offer tips and recommendations that you can use to pack your video game consoles, TVs and other electronics properly. Review any electronics product manuals at your disposal, and you can gain deep insights into how to pack these items.

If you lost an electronics product manual, there is no need to worry. Most manufacturers will post information on their respective websites about how to pack various electronics. Or, you can always contact the manufacturer directly or consult with an electronics retailer.

In addition, if you still have the original electronics box, you may want to use this box on moving day. The original box is the perfect size for your electronics, and as a result, will make it simple for you to pack and store your electronics safely until you complete your move.

2. Pick Up the Right Packing Materials

Tape, bubble wrap and other packing materials are essential, particularly for those who want to protect their electronics.

Visit a local convenience store or supermarket to pick up a wide range of packing materials. By doing so, you can purchase the packing items you need to properly secure your electronics.

Furthermore, if you need moving boxes for your electronics, a convenience store or supermarket may be able to help you out. Contact local convenience stores and supermarkets, and these businesses may be able to supply you with free boxes that they no longer need to store a variety of electronics.

3. Proceed with Caution

Most electronics consist of glass and other sensitive materials, so you'll want to do everything possible to protect these items.

It usually helps to wrap electronics in moving pads, sheets or light blankets. You also should wrap electronics in linen or clean paper to minimize the risk of dust damage.

For those who want expert help with packing electronics, you may want to hire a professional moving company. With this business at your disposal, you can receive comprehensive assistance as you prepare your electronics and other belongings for moving day.

Lastly, if you need extra help as you search for a moving company or try to buy or sell a house, you should work with a real estate agent.

Real estate agents are available in cities and towns nationwide. These housing market professionals can connect you with local moving experts, along with provide plenty of support throughout the homebuying or home selling process.

Ready to pack up your electronics? Use the aforementioned best practices, and you can keep your electronics safe as you get ready to relocate to a new address.


All communities have increases and decreases in population, demographics, and times when several (or very few) homes are on the market. Sometimes, it's merely that the stars aligned for several homeowners at the same time. Once in a while, because the market is particularly hot, many of the owners hope to cash in on the rising prices. In a few cases, however, it is a BIG. RED. FLAG.

Proceed with caution.

Getting in early to a neighborhood that is on the cusp of gentrifying—of becoming that trendy place where everybody wants to live—can be a savvy move for personal homebuyers and investment purchases. But just because the neighborhood next door made the transition doesn’t always mean this one is next up.

If you can purchase several homes in the neighborhood, you can try to force the upward change, but if you’re buying your first family home, take heed of a few signs that a community has headed down instead of up.

Lots of homes for sale.

As noted above, sometimes it’s just a fluke that several homes go on the market at once. Other times, it is because some community event triggered it. This event could be a school district redistricting so that students no longer qualify to go to the school they planned for, an increase in a local tax, because the water/sewer lines need upgrading but the city isn't budging, or an increase in homeowner association dues.

Association woes.

Speaking of homeowner associations, sometimes it's not the dues, it's just the restrictive rules. If all the houses look identical; if the color palette seems to be within one or two hues; if the turf is all the same grass, the neighborhood might have a super-controlling association. While many folks are fine with tightly-defined rules, you'll want to know going in so that your dreams of a minty-green paint over all that red brick aren't dashed on the rocks of the rulebook and covenants.

School shuffling.

If the school district is moving the lines, it's important to know before you invest. The changes might be in your favor, in which case: get right in there and make your move. But if you had old information on where your kids would qualify to go, you need to know.

Different demographics.

In older neighborhoods, an aging population may be in transition out. If so, that might signal the perfect time for younger families to move in, upgrade, update, and upscale the homes into this decade. One way for you to know for sure is to speak to people that know. Talk to the neighbors when you go to that open house. Drive along the streets at the end of the workday to see who is coming and going. Stop by in the morning for a look at how many kids are heading to the school bus stop.

Your local real estate specialist pays attention to trends and can tell you how many homes have sold within the last few years, so use their expertise before making the leap.


If you buy or sell a house, you may need to hire a moving company as well. That way, you can work with an expert moving company to ensure all of your personal belongings can safely make it to your new address.

Ultimately, there are lots of things you can do to put yourself in the best position to conduct a successful search for a moving company, such as:

1. Reach Out to Multiple Moving Companies

There is no shortage of moving companies available in cities and towns nationwide. Thus, if you reach out to several moving firms, you should have no trouble finding one that matches your budget.

Account for your moving timeline as you search for a moving company, too. The top moving companies may be in high demand. But if you can give a moving company plenty of notice about your upcoming relocation, you can boost the likelihood that this business can help you on moving day.

2. Request Client Referrals

Sometimes, it can be tough to differentiate one moving company from another. If you ask a moving company for client referrals, however, you can learn from a business' past clients. Then, you can use these client referrals to help you decide if a particular moving company is right for you.

A moving company typically can provide client referrals upon request. Meanwhile, you should ask a moving company's past clients about their experiences. You then can use these clients' insights to determine if a moving company can match or exceed your expectations.

3. Evaluate a Moving Company's Services

Moving companies may provide a wide range of services for residential and commercial customers. As such, you should examine a moving company's services to find a business that can help you accomplish your desired results.

If you need a moving company that can help you pack and move your belongings from Point A to Point B, for example, you should hire a business that can fulfill your request. On the other hand, if you need a moving company that can handle an out-of-state relocation, you should hone your moving company search accordingly.

When it comes to finding the right moving company, you may encounter myriad challenges along the way. Lucky for you, a real estate agent may be able to help you speed up your search to find the right moving company.

In addition to helping you buy or sell a residence, a real estate agent may provide moving company recommendations. He or she also may be able to put you in touch with the top moving companies in your city or town.

For those who want to streamline an upcoming move, it generally is a good idea to hire a moving company. Thanks to the aforementioned tips, you can conduct a comprehensive search for a moving company in your area. As a result, you may quickly find a moving company that can take the guesswork out of transporting all of your belongings to your new home.


When you’ve gone through the lengthy and tiring process of seeking out, bidding on, and buying a new home and then sell your home, the last thing you want to worry about is cleaning your old house before you leave.

 However, there’s multiple reasons you’ll want to ensure your old house is clean before you leave. First, as a common courtesy, you’ll want the new owners of your home to have a good first experience and to maintain your rapport with them after closing day. However, there are also legal and financial issues at play.

If your contract states that your home needs to have been “broom-swept” or some other form of cleaning before you leave, then your new owners could technically postpone closing. Furthermore, some states have laws requiring that homes are cleaned by their previous owners before they move out.

 Although it can be difficult to define just how clean a home needs to be, legally speaking, your best option is to do your part to leave the home relatively clean, whether that means cleaning it yourself or hiring a cleaning company.

Legal reasons for cleaning your old house

As mentioned earlier, some states state cleaning requirements in the purchase contract when you sell your home. Their definitions of clean can often be vague, but usually include sweeping floors, wiping down surfaces, stripping nails and hangers from walls, and carrying out all furniture and garbage.

These rules are mostly designed to protect people who purchase a home from getting stuck with bulk items and other surprise issues that they’ll have to pay for.

An exception to this is when your home is sold “as is” or when you have some form of written agreement between you and the new owner that some part f your home will be left as is.

Cleaning your house

The ideal time to clean your house is once you’ve moved everything out. However, if you’re moving over a long distance, you might not be able to return to the house once it’s empty to give it a final cleaning.

In this case, your best option is to have your furniture and boxes packed away neatly in the garage, or in the corner of one room. Doing so will allow you to sweep, clean surfaces, wipe down cabinets, and so on, while your belongings are still in the house.

Just be sure to keep a broom handy once you’ve put everything on the moving truck so you can give one last sweep of the floor before you say goodbye to your old home.

Cleaning checklist

It can be difficult to keep track of everything you’ll want to clean before you move out, so here’s a list to go by:

  • Sweep all floors

  • Vacuum all carpets

  • Wipe down cabinets, shelves

  • Try to sweep under appliances, oven, etc.

  • Spray sinks and tubs, leave air freshener in bathroom

  • Wipe inside of refrigerator, if applicable

  • Remove all nails from walls

  • Do a final walkthrough and remove any trash you’ve missed